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My Sweet Rose


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Divecat
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Joined: 03 Apr 2008
Posts: 172
Location: England
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4:50 am Nov 24, 2009

Excellent, thanks Rife.

A SAL for Ehrets would be great Very Happy

Christine x
Patricia
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Joined: 08 Jan 2009
Posts: 186
Location: Florida and Ontario
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1:43 pm Dec 05, 2009

quote:
Originally posted by rifestitch
quote:
Originally posted by Divecat
Ummmm, what's a SAL?


Stitch A Long - where two or more people work on the same project, and keep each other up to date with their individual progress, and keep each other motivated to the Big Finish!

Divecat thanks for asking, Rife thanks for answering. I was wondering what a SAL was..so..who all is working on Ehret???? I sure am not up on the language of initials.. Rolling Eyes
Divecat
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Joined: 03 Apr 2008
Posts: 172
Location: England
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6:14 am Dec 07, 2009

My hand is up and guilty as charged Laughing Laughing Laughing
Patricia
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Joined: 08 Jan 2009
Posts: 186
Location: Florida and Ontario
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7:18 pm Dec 07, 2009

quote:
Originally posted by Divecat
My hand is up and guilty as charged Laughing Laughing Laughing


Are we the onlies??? Question I am enjoying do it but can't stay away. I am spending too much time on it, but I am anxious to get the the first lady's face. no will power at all..at all.. Stitching Not ready to do a show and tell yet.
Divecat
Member
Joined: 03 Apr 2008
Posts: 172
Location: England
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5:07 am Dec 08, 2009

No, we're not the only ones - LisaR is doing it too. Addictive, isn't it as there are specific parts to 'aim' for Laughing Laughing Laughing

Stitching Christine x

PS, the figures to the extreme left and right are actually males (although they look VERY androgenous!)
Patricia
Member
Joined: 08 Jan 2009
Posts: 186
Location: Florida and Ontario
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7:56 am Dec 08, 2009

quote:
Originally posted by Divecat
No, we're not the only ones - LisaR is doing it too. Addictive, isn't it as there are specific parts to 'aim' for Laughing Laughing Laughing

Stitching Christine x

PS, the figures to the extreme left and right are actually males (although they look VERY androgenous!)


Well, Idea I thought they were not very feminine looking for the time. women then did not have short hair nor did they wear armor. I googled the meaning of the ehret. The write up did not say they were men, but I did wonder. thanks .
Divecat
Member
Joined: 03 Apr 2008
Posts: 172
Location: England
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8:10 am Dec 08, 2009

Hi Patricia

Here is the info I found when I did some research on Ehret which I found helps when progressing the piece:

Ehret die Frauen - Marianne Stokes
A medieval-style tapestry inspired by and illustrating a verse by Schiller praising the feminine virtues. The Gothic lettering at the top says

Ehret die frauen sie flechten und weben
himmlische rosen ins irdische leben

Honour to the women, they braid and weave
heavenly roses into earthly life.

This is a rectangular tapestry with figurative design inspired by a quotation from Schiller's poem Wurde der Frauen (Women's Worth), 1796 woven in the form of a scroll into the top border. The other three sides are patterned with an olive leaf border. The background is rose vines and other flowers on blue with a border of laurel leaves. The field shows three women representing 'pflege' (caring), 'liebe' (love) and 'wissen' (wisdom). Each woman is shown with a child. 'Caring' on the left is nurturing a young boy, who wears an animal skin, with a bowl of milk; a pelican and three chicks are depicted behind her. 'Love' cradles a baby in her left arm and holds a rose in her right hand. 'Wisdom' holds an alphabet slate in her right hand and a lantern in her left hand so that a small boy in a hooded gown can learn to read; an owl is perched behind her right shoulder. On each side is a knight in armour holding a banner; the banner on the left is inscribed 'schulz' (courage) and the banner on the right is inscribed 'treue' (fidelity).

The Merton Abbey monogram is woven into the bottom right hand corner.

The piece was designed by Marianne Stokes and woven by Morris and Company in 1912.

The picture is courtesy of Scarlet Quince (www.scarletquince.com) and the text courtesy of The Whitworth Art Gallery, Manchester, where this piece can be viewed.
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