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Finishing and Framing


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Tammy93063
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Finishing and Framing     Reply with quote  
 
 
5:02 pm Jan 04, 2005

I have several completed projects waiting to be framed. The frame store I use does a wonderful job, but matting and framing is expensive. Does anyone have any suggestions? Also, if you have 3 dimensional embroidery to hang, how would you frame it? Would you put it under glass?
BarBaraPrz
Member
Joined: 16 Apr 2004
Posts: 420
Location: Hamilton, Ontario
Re: Finishing and Framing     Reply with quote  
 
 
8:46 am Jan 05, 2005

quote:
Originally posted by Tammy93063
Also, if you have 3 dimensional embroidery to hang, how would you frame it? Would you put it under glass?


That would kind of defeat the purpose, wouldn't it? (Unless you used a shadow box-type frame, I suppose.)
BarBaraPrz
Member
Joined: 16 Apr 2004
Posts: 420
Location: Hamilton, Ontario
Re: Finishing and Framing     Reply with quote  
 
 
8:52 am Jan 05, 2005

quote:
Originally posted by Tammy93063
...but matting and framing is expensive. Does anyone have any suggestions?


Sometimes, I turn a piece into a banner. And I'm always picking up nice frames at thrift stores...
4dogs
Guest


Re: Finishing and Framing     Reply with quote  
 
 
5:40 pm Feb 07, 2006

quote:
Originally posted by Tammy93063
I have several completed projects waiting to be framed. The frame store I use does a wonderful job, but matting and framing is expensive. Does anyone have any suggestions? Also, if you have 3 dimensional embroidery to hang, how would you frame it? Would you put it under glass?

Have you thought about taking a framing class? That is my plan, as I have 17 pieces that need to be nicely framed and its way too expensive to have them done at a shop...js
Fabala
Member
Joined: 09 Nov 2005
Posts: 134
Location: Atlanta, GA
    Reply with quote  
 
 
10:10 am Feb 09, 2006

If you do a lot of crafts, I recommend getting a mat cutter. It's a little bit of an investment, but if you are going to be paying for framing for more than 2 or 3 projects - it is worth it, and not that hard to use. Mat board is much cheaper if you buy it in sheets uncut from an Art Supply store, than if you get it from a framer.

As to the 3-D embroidery... you CAN put it under glass, just double mat, or use a really THICK mat type, so that the texture does not get smashed against the glass. (It will look like a shallow window box.) Make sure the frame you choose is deep enough to accommodate the work, the mat, AND the glass.

Some people like to have the work covered by glass because it preserves it a little... some glass filters UV and therefore keeps your work from fading.

Also, the tapestry/banner method works well too. It's a nice change in texture, having the fabric exposed on the wall, you just have to make sure you do a GOOD finishing job on the edges, as over the years the fabric will become more brittle and may crack if handled too often or too roughly. Tapestries also collect dust and absorb odors from smoking or food cooking, so keep that in mind if you intend your work to last as an heirloom.

I hope all this was helpful.

Fabala
Hibrida
Member
Joined: 31 Mar 2007
Posts: 8
Location: northern California, USA
wall-hangings     Reply with quote  
 
 
2:45 pm Apr 01, 2007

quote:
Originally posted by Fabala
Also, the tapestry/banner method works well too.


It's a traditional use. It's not only eye-candy, it's also an acoustic damper and wall insulation. Even a bell-pull can contribute to acoustic dampening (reduction of echoes in an empty room and reduction of noise from the other side of the same wall).

This does require planning. Fibers must be suitable for cleaning, otherwise it'd been better to shield them from the environment more than just keeping the item away from UV light.

On banners or bell-pulls, using piping or cording on the item's vertical edges would be my second choice. Binding the edges with intent to renew the binding once or twice each century, if necessary, would be my first. The regular method of adding only a facing or lining would be my third and least preference.

One of the blessings of stitching with cotton, linen, or silk is that there's less terror of insect infestation. I have a linen twill draw-string bag that'd been embellished with traditional wool crewelwork. The stitching itself had been devoured, leaving the linen fully intact.

Anywhere with smoke or grease in the air, it's necessary to either physically protect the needlework or plan on cleaning it regularly.

Hibrida
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