Cross Stitch Patterns from Fine Art by Scarlet Quince
 Cart 
 Wish list
     |     
     |     
Check out
     |     
     |     
Wholesale log in
Member services
Scarlet Quince
Solutions
Forums

US vs UK


Page 1 of 4
Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4  Next

Author Topic
Alanna
Member
Joined: 27 Aug 2006
Posts: 633
Location: Brisbane, Australia
US vs UK     Reply with quote  
 
 
1:06 am Jul 30, 2009

Hi everyone!

Well our forums have been a little quiet lately, and if it's for the same reason as me, it's because work is spilling over into home life!
And this is the topic of this post: work. As some of you know I'm a translator, and I'm currently translating a film script into English for an American audience. Now I'm generally okay with most americanisms but there are some things I just get a bit confused about, so I'm thinking where do I have access to a lot of Americans...? Here! And if you come from anywhere near the Mexican border all the better because I need a lot of slang from that kind of area.

There are lots of things I need to check but the first is the difference between hall/hallway and corridor. Which one is American? (as in the long narrow room which has lots of other rooms leading off it, either in an office building, school, etc. or in a normal house).

Thank you! I'll get back to you shortly with more questions...
Alanna
Member
Joined: 27 Aug 2006
Posts: 633
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Re: US vs UK     Reply with quote  
 
 
1:25 am Jul 30, 2009

Another one: what do you call the thing you dry the wet dishes with? (I call it a teatowel).
Alanna
Member
Joined: 27 Aug 2006
Posts: 633
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Re: US vs UK     Reply with quote  
 
 
1:28 am Jul 30, 2009

And in American English, when watching TV do you change station or change channel? or change THE channel?
Lani
Member
Joined: 26 Aug 2008
Posts: 50
Location: The Woodlands, Texas
Re: US vs UK     Reply with quote  
 
 
8:41 am Jul 30, 2009

Alanna -

Great idea to post your questions here! You can use hall or hallway, but hall is usually used more often. For instance, you would say: "I am walking down the hall"'; but hallway would be used to convey something like: "The hallway is rather large." If you are using the word refering to a house or office, hall or hallway would be used. Personally, I don't really say "Corridor" too often, unless refering to a passageway between two buildings.

I always say change THE channel, and I refer to a towel used to dry dishes as a dish towel.

It might be helpful on the hall/hallway/corridor difference to know how the word would be used in a sentence.

I do think there differences depending on where you live in the US. I have lived in the Southwest almost all of my life, and I currently live in Texas north of Houston.

Anyway, if this is all as "clear as mud" (not sure if this is an Americanism or not!), just post for a clarification! This sounds like a fun project for you!
Meredith
Site Admin
Joined: 23 Feb 2004
Posts: 128
    Reply with quote  
 
 
10:35 am Jul 30, 2009

I agree with Lani on usage, but I was born in the midwest, where some people worsh and wrench the dishes before drying them with the dish towel. (I've always washed and rinsed, but thought that might be fun for you to know.) Very Happy
sverzino
Member
Joined: 26 Oct 2006
Posts: 88
Location: St. Louis, MO
    Reply with quote  
 
 
12:58 pm Jul 30, 2009

I agree with all the language notes Lani & Meredith have said. I've lived in the midwest Missouri all my life and the worsh/wrench is more of a rural thing. Laughing
Alanna
Member
Joined: 27 Aug 2006
Posts: 633
Location: Brisbane, Australia
    Reply with quote  
 
 
6:09 pm Jul 30, 2009

Thanks so much everyone!! Really REALLY helpful!

I'll keep them coming:

What general name would you call a cop if you didn't know his specific rank? (In Australia we'd say 'officer', in the UK they'd say 'constable').

I have lots more so keep checking this space!! Very Happy
Alanna
Member
Joined: 27 Aug 2006
Posts: 633
Location: Brisbane, Australia
    Reply with quote  
 
 
6:25 pm Jul 30, 2009

Okay, this might sound silly, but in the US do you honk your horn or beep your horn (in the car)?

And a bit of a rude one (sorry, this IS a cop flick!): when you make a rude gesture and extend your middle finger at someone (or two fingers, depending where you're from), what do you call this? We call this sticking your finger up at someone or giving someone the finger. I think I recall hearing in a movie once the expression flipping someone off, is that right?

Thanks!
Alanna
Member
Joined: 27 Aug 2006
Posts: 633
Location: Brisbane, Australia
    Reply with quote  
 
 
6:34 pm Jul 30, 2009

Right, another one, more cop talk (sorry, I know you guys aren't specialised in this, but you might have more of an idea than I do):

What would you call the main office/headquarters for all the police stations of a city? I'm thinking "Central" (i.e. a cop out in the field who wants information will radio in to 'central' to get a licence no or something...).

Also, normal police station is called a police precinct, right?
Alanna
Member
Joined: 27 Aug 2006
Posts: 633
Location: Brisbane, Australia
    Reply with quote  
 
 
6:36 pm Jul 30, 2009

More cop stuff: the forensics guys in their white outfits- what are these called? Overalls? Jumpsuits?
  Display posts from past:      

Page 1 of 4
Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4  Next


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group
 


Privacy policy | Site map | Member services | | Help
Copyright © 2002-2017 Scarlet Quince™. All rights reserved.